Reverb 10, days 1 and 2 – one word & writing

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Inspired by Em, I’ve signed up for Reverb 10.  Reverb 10 is an annual event and online initiative to reflect on the year and manifest what’s next, using daily creative prompts.  The idea behind it is that the end of the year is an opportunity to reflect on what’s happened, and to send out reverberations for the year ahead.

I’m already a day behind, so I’ll use both the prompts for 1st and 2nd December today.

December 1 One Word.
Encapsulate the year 2010 in one word. Explain why you’re choosing that word. Now, imagine it’s one year from today, what would you like the word to be that captures 2011 for you?

The one word that sums up 2010 for me is change.  There have been a lot of changes this year, both professionally and personally, both wanted and unwanted.   Losing my job and deciding to go part time freelance, with the challenges that this has created.  Realising that I’m getting older and the relationship between me and friends is inexorably altering, as new partnerships, new locations, and new babies come along.  Getting married and all the changes, subtle but tangible, that have come with this new relationship status.

I’m lucky, however, that the changes have mostly been positive and have led to some wonderful, previously-unthought-of, brilliant things.  Without change, life really would be very boring, and as I get older, I’m definitely getting more positive in embracing change and everything that comes with it.

What word would I like 2011 to capture? Contented.  I’d like to end the year knowing that I’ve achieved what I wanted to achieve, and don’t have any regrets about not doing things.  There are several things I’ve got in the pipeline for 2011 and I really, really hope they all come off.  I’m not being naive: I know that there’s no way that the next year is going to be perfect – when is life ever perfect? –  but if in twelve months from now I can look back and see that I’ve achieved these goals, then I really will be contented.

December 2 Writing.
What do you do each day that doesn’t contribute to your writing — and can you eliminate it?

To be honest, I think everything I do each day contributes to my writing – it’s what we do in our everyday life, whether good or bad, that moulds and forms our written expressions.  I started this blog nearly two years ago as a way of making myself write, and it’s the things I do each day that form its content: from the small and mundane to the massive and life-changing.

Of course, life gets in the way sometimes; we can all be just too busy to sit down and put pen to paper, or fingers to keyboard.  Every so often I swear I’ll finish this novel I started three years ago, even if no-one other than me ever reads it.  Maybe that can also be my word(s) for 2011: get your arse in gear.

 

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